Monthly Archives: June 2017

June 2017 in the Organic Vegetable Garden

Potomac Overlook Regional Park, Arlington, VA By Nancy Dowling, Certified Master Gardener Walking into the Organic Vegetable Garden (OVG) in early June after having been gone for nearly a month, I was amazed by the changes that had taken place … Continue reading

Posted in MG in the Garden

TREE: Chionanthus virginicus (White Fringetree)

An appealing addition to the landscape, this native is rare in Pennsylvania and historical in Delaware’s Piedmont, but frequent to common elsewhere in the Mid-Atlantic Region. The Virginia Native Plant Society named White Fringetree as Wildflower of the Year in 1997. Be aware though, it also appeals to deer! Continue reading

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Lessons from the Garden

by Judy Funderburk, Certified Master Gardener Judy Funderburk, Emeritus Coordinator of the Glencarlyn Library Community Garden,  shared her wisdom at the MGNV Membership Meeting, on June 21, 2017. For those who could not attend and those who want to ponder … Continue reading

Posted in Glencarlyn, MG in the Garden

Sunny Garden Leaves No Stones Unturned

by Joe Kelly, Certified Master Gardener Although we’ll never stop adding new plants and moving others, the Sunny Garden’s multi-year renovation is finally coming to a close. Right now, the late-spring bloom peak has brought a burst of colors, thanks … Continue reading

Posted in MG in the Garden, Sunny Garden

PERENNIAL: Baptisia australis, Blue Wild Indigo

Tried and True Native Plant Selections for the Mid-Atlantic Baptisia is a bold plant that in early spring produces multiple stems of beautiful gray-green foliage.  By mid-spring the foliage is topped by 1- to 2-foot flowering spikes that are a magnificent blue … Continue reading

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Five Annuals for a Pollinator Garden

Pollinators such as bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds gravitate to gardens that bloom throughout the growing season and that contain an abundance of the same plant species as well as a diversity of species of like colors arranged together. Annuals, with their extended bloom period, ensure a continual nectar source for pollinators when perennials have yet to flower or are in decline. Continue reading

Posted in MG in the Garden, Pollinators, Public Education