Hibiscus moscheutos (Swamp or Eastern Rose-mallow)

Tried and True Native Plant Selections for the Mid-Atlantic

This stately perennial is native* to wet areas such as marshes, swamps, riverbanks, and moist meadows and woods scattered around the eastern United States. While each of its flowers lasts only a day, it can be covered with up to 20 striking, saucer-shaped blooms at a time.

*In the Mid-Atlantic Region, it is native to DC and MD, common in the Coastal Plain of DE, and concentrated near the Delaware River in PA. It is common in the Coastal Plain, frequent in the Piedmont, and infrequent in the mountains in VA. In NoVA, it is native to Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties.

Print Version (Legal Size): Hibiscus moscheutos (Swamp or Eastern Rose-mallow)
Perennial Height: 3–7 feet Spread: 4–9 Bloom Color: White to pink Characteristics Shrubby herbaceous perennial with multiple upright, sturdy stems from a single crown Large, green, toothed, ovate leaves are white and hairy underneath Large, showy, white or pink 5-petaled flowers with crimson eye and tubular stamens Jul to Sep Brown seed capsules last through winter Spreads by seed capsules that can float on water Attributes Tolerates wet soil, heat, humidity, and drought after establishment; no serious pests or diseases; deer occasionally severely damage Winter interest of dried seed capsules Attracts bees and hummers to nectar; larval host to Common Checkered Skipper, Gray Hairstreak, & Painted Lady butterflies and some moth species Growing and Maintenance Tips Soil Requirements: Rich to average Light Requirements: Sun Water Requirements: Moist, Wet Pinch growing tips at 4 and 8 inches for bushy plants and deadhead individual flowers Site away from wind and with good air circulation Use in moist borders, containers, and rain gardens and by ponds Hardiness: USDA Zones 5–9 Excellent Replacement for Hibiscus syriacus - Rose of Sharon *In the Mid-Atlantic Region, it is native to DC and MD, common in the Coastal Plain of DE, and concentrated near the Delaware River in PA. It is common in the Coastal Plain, frequent in the Piedmont, and infrequent in the mountains in VA. In NoVA, it is native to Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties.Learn more about other Mid-Atlantic plants: Tried and True Plant Fact Sheets