Lilium superbum (Turk’s-cap Lily)

Tried and True Native Plant Selections for the Mid-Atlantic

The tallest and showiest of the native lilies, Turk’s-cap frequents wet meadows and moist woods primarily in the Mid-Atlantic Region.* A single plant can bear up to 40 individual flowers, which are noted for their stunning color, reflexed tepals, and prominent stamens.

*In the Mid-Atlantic Region, it is native to DC, common in DE, and reported in10 MD counties and a majority of PA counties It is locally frequent in the mountains and widespread but infrequent in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain in VA. In NoVA, it is native to Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties.

Print Version (Legal Size): Lilium superbum (Turk’s-cap Lily)
Perennial Plant in Bud, Flowers Height: 4–7 feet Spread: 1⁄2–1 foot Bloom Color: Orange Characteristics Herbaceous perennial with a stout, smooth, unbranched stem from a bulb Lance-shaped leaves with smooth margins and parallel veins arranged in whorls around stem Nodding orange flowers with greenish throats; maroon spots; reflexed tepals; long, brown-tipped stigma; and exserted stamens July to August Oblong, three-lobed fruit capsules contain flat seeds with papery wings in September Spreads by wind-borne seeds and bulb offsets Attributes Tolerates wet soil or drought when established No serious pests or diseases Deer occasionally to frequently severely damage Native Americans used bulbs in soups Attracts hummers and large day-flying insects Growing and Maintenance Tips Soil Requirements: Well-drained Light Requirements: Sun, Partial Shade Water Requirements: Moist, Wet Plant bulbs 5–6 inches deep in fall; mulch May need staking for support Mass in low spots, rain gardens, by pond edges Hardiness: USDA Zones 5–8 Excellent Replacement for Hemerocallis fulva - Common Daylily and Lilium lancifolium - Tiger Lily *In the Mid-Atlantic Region, it is native to DC, common in DE, and reported in10 MD counties and a majority of PA counties It is locally frequent in the mountains and widespread but infrequent in the Piedmont and Coastal Plain in VA. In NoVA, it is native to Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince William counties.
Learn more about other Mid-Atlantic plants: Tried and True Plant Fact Sheets