Tag Archives: bark

Identifying Trees by Their Bark

Woody plants can be identified upon close examination of their bark. Variations in color and texture of bark, as well as other characteristics, provide helpful clues to a plant’s identity. Read on to learn more about bark and then test your own tree identification skills with the Bark Quiz, which will appear each Sunday in 2020 on our Facebook page. Continue reading

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In the Winter Garden, 2019 Edition

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays! Appreciating the winter garden makes for a happier all-season gardener, so this article, written by EMG Mary Free in December 2012, was worth revising and updating. Our gardens may lay mostly dormant in this season, but still there are some herbaceous and woody plants with color, form, and texture that can both surprise and delight in the winter landscape. Continue reading

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Healthy Bark, Healthy Tree Part 2: Mechanical and Weather Damage

Mechanical damage is the most preventable of bark injuries because it is often due to impatience, inattention, or ignorance. Careless maintenance practices can damage trees that take decades, not weeks, to grow. While we cannot control the weather, which can cause irreparable bark injury, we can control what plants we purchase and where we choose to locate them—the right plant in the right place increases its chances of surviving weather extremes. Enjoy the amazing photographs in this article on preventing mechanical and weather damage to trees. Continue reading

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Healthy Bark, Healthy Tree Part 1: Wildlife Damage

Trees have numerous ways to protect themselves. They can emit chemicals that repel invaders or attract predators to the invaders. If trees are wounded, they can try to compartmentalize the disease, by isolating or “walling off” the infected area and halting the spread of the infection. But it is bark that provides the first line of protection for a tree. Continue reading

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