Tag Archives: Chasmanthium latifolium

Word of the Week: Culm

Culms is the term used to describe the stems of the monocotyledonous plants called graminoids, as in Poaceae (grasses), Cyperaceae (sedges), Juncaceae (rushes), and Typhaceae (cattails). Continue reading

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Word of the Week: Glabrous

While the word comes from the Latin glaber (bald), and is so used in literature to describe, for example, the skin on an old man’s head, when used in the scientific sense, glabrous means skin that was never meant to have hair, like the palms of our hands, and in botany, plant parts that are without surface projections. Continue reading

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Grasses vs. Sedges

Grasses and sedges are both classified as monocots. These are plants whose seeds have one cotyledon (the part that will grow into embryonic leaves), and which possess flower parts in multiples of three, leaves with parallel veins, and scattered vascular bundles.  While they resemble each other superficially, grasses are members of the Poaceae family and sedges belong to the Cyperaceae family. Continue reading

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Native Grasses for Fall and Winter

As summer’s annuals are beginning to fade and fall perennials are putting on their last show of bloom, native grasses take on a more prominent role in the natural landscape. Continue reading

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