Tag Archives: invasive plants

Plant This, Not That: Replacing Nandina

Great suggestions for native plants that will replace invasive Nandina domestica (Heavenly bamboo). Continue reading

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Updated Website Resources on Invasive Plants

Updated Website Resources on Invasive Plants

Some popular, even beloved, plants in Northern Virginia are not as benign as they appear. Because their seeds and fruits can be dispersed by birds and mammals at some distance from cultivated backyard landscapes, plants such as honeysuckle, butterfly bush, periwinkle, and rose of Sharon have become invasive, spreading to roadsides, streams, fields, and forests where they displace native species, alter natural plant communities, and degrade the environment. To help homeowners, the Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia social media team is completely revising a set of fact sheets on locally invasive plants. Continue reading

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Invasive Plants in Northern Virginia: Japanese Knotweed

Invasive Plants in Northern Virginia: Japanese Knotwood

Japanese knotweed is a particularly aggressive buckwheat family member found throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. The plant was introduced to the United States from Japan in the early 1800s as an ornamental and erosion-control plant and has been considered as invasive, especially in riparian areas, since it escaped cultivation in the 1930s.

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Invasive Plants in Northern Virginia: Canada Thistle

Invasive Plants in Northern Virginia: Canada Thistle

Cirsium arvense, (Canada thistle), a native of southeastern Europe and the Mediterranean, was brought to North America in early 1700s, probably as a contaminant of crop seed.  By the end of the century is was already recognized as a noxious weed in crops, and it is now recognized as invasive in open natural areas, such as fields, meadows, wet prairies, and even inhospitable sand dunes, through most of the United States. Continue reading

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