Tag Archives: Vernonia noveboracensis

PERENNIAL: Vernonia noveboracensis (New York Ironweed)

Tried and True Native Plant Selections for the Mid-Atlantic
Fluffy deep purple blooms atop 8-foot tall sturdy stalks draw bees and butterflies from mid-summer into fall. Continue reading

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Word of the Week: Lanceolate

It would be fair to wonder why we even add the word lanceolate to our glossary, it seems so self-explanatory – shaped like a lance. Yet there are nuances, and leaves described as lanceolate turn out not to be shaped exactly like that in all cases. The term is used in botany primarily to describe leaf shape in a way that helps us identify a plant or at least separate one species or variety from another. Continue reading

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Word of the Week: Pappus

The word pappus might bring to mind dandelions and the “puff ball” seed heads you may have played with in your youth. However, if the word conjures up the silky “parachutes” of milkweed, think again. Although both appendages aid in the dispersal of their seeds, a pappus is an appendage to cypsela, the fruit of plants in the Asteraceae (aster family). Dandelion is a member of the aster family; milkweed is not.* Continue reading

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Taking a Closer Look at Roadside Wildflowers  

Many of the wildflowers seen along local roadways or on day-trips to the beach or mountains (those yellow, orange, purple or pink blurs) can be viewed close-up in the Glencarlyn Library Community Garden in Arlington, VA. Continue reading

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