Viburnum prunifolium, Black Haw

Tried and True Native Plant Selections for the Mid-Atlantic

This elegant large shrub to small tree, found in woods and thickets, has an upright oval crown when young, often becoming irregular with drooping lower branches.  Creamy-white flowers give way to edible pink berries that ripen to deep blue-black.

Print Version: Viburnum prunifolium, Black Haw

Viburnum prunifolium, Black Haw Tags: Shrub, Height: 12–15 feet, Spread: 6–12 feet, Bloom Color: White, Large, upright, multi-stemmed deciduous shrub or small, single-trunk tree, Deep green oval leaves, Flat clusters of creamy, sweetly fragrant flowers in April and May, Edible blue-black drupes from July to November, Flaming red to burgundy fall foliage, Tolerates clay soil, drought, air pollution, and black walnut, No serious pests or diseases; deer seldom severely damage but may browse twigs & foliage, Fruit may be eaten when ripe or used in preserves, Flowers attract myriad (mainly small) bees, flies and Lepidoptera; larval host to various moths including Hummingbird Clearwing; fruits attract birds and small animals, Growing and Maintenance Tips: Soil Requirements: Average, well-drained, Light Requirements: Full Sun, Partial Shade, Water Requirements: Dry, Moist, Prune immediately after flowering because buds for next year’s flowers form in summer, Hardiness: USDA Zones 3–9, Excellent Replacement for Eleagnus umbellata - Autumn Olive, Euonymus alatus - Burning Bush, Ligustrum species - Privets

Learn more about other Mid-Atlantic plants: Tried and True Plant Fact Sheets


Tags: Shrub, Height: 12–15 feet, Spread: 6–12 feet, Bloom Color: White, Large, upright, multi-stemmed deciduous shrub or small, single-trunk tree, Deep green oval leaves, Flat clusters of creamy, sweetly fragrant flowers in April and May, Edible blue-black drupes from July to November, Flaming red to burgundy fall foliage, Tolerates clay soil, drought, air pollution, and black walnut, No serious pests or diseases; deer seldom severely damage but may browse twigs & foliage, Fruit may be eaten when ripe or used in preserves, Flowers attract myriad (mainly small) bees, flies and Lepidoptera; larval host to various moths including Hummingbird Clearwing; fruits attract birds and small animals, Growing and Maintenance Tips: Soil Requirements: Average, well-drained, Light Requirements: Full Sun, Partial Shade, Water Requirements: Dry, Moist, Prune immediately after flowering because buds for next year’s flowers form in summer, Hardiness: USDA Zones 3–9, Excellent Replacement for Eleagnus umbellata – Autumn Olive, Euonymus alatus – Burning Bush, Ligustrum species – Privets