Author Archives: MGNV Webmaster

Three Native Ground Covers for Shade

Homeowners might wish to introduce these three attractive and reliable groundcovers in the shady sections of their own yards.
✼ Marginal Wood Fern (Dryopteris marginalis)
✼ Foamflower (Tiarella cordifolia)
✼ Allegheny Spurge (Pachysandra procumbens) Continue reading

Posted in Ground Cover, Native Plants | Comments Off on Three Native Ground Covers for Shade

Word of the Week: Phyllotaxis

The three major patterns of phyllotaxis are alternate, opposite, and whorled, as shown in the illustration below. How leaves are arranged on the stem (axis) is one of the tools for classifying and identifying plants. Continue reading

Posted in Illustrated Glossary, Word of the Week, WoW | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Word of the Week: Phyllotaxis

TREE: Aesculus pavia (Red Buckeye)

2020 Tried and True Native Plant Selections for the Mid-Atlantic

Native mostly to the southeastern United States,* this understory tree
is found in woods and along streams. Its common name refers to
shiny seeds called buckeyes, which are encased in husked seed
capsules. Its showy flowers, suggestive of firecrackers, have led to
its alternative name, Firecracker Plant. Continue reading

Posted in Tree, Tried and True Native Plant Selections for the Mid-Atlantic | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on TREE: Aesculus pavia (Red Buckeye)

Protecting Yourself From Ticks . . . Without Harming Pollinators

Protect yourself from ticks without destroying beneficial insects. Spraying pesticides to control ticks is ineffective because ticks reside primarily within leaf litter where the sprays cannot reach them, or they are brought in by animal hosts. The pesticides, however, are nonselective and will kill pollinators and other beneficial insects they come in contact with. There are much more effective ways to protect yourself, your family, and your pets and still enjoy the outdoors. Continue reading

Posted in Mosquitoes & Ticks, Pests, Public Education | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Protecting Yourself From Ticks . . . Without Harming Pollinators