Category Archives: Demonstration Gardens

Simpson Gardens Tuesday Strolls

Come to our monthly garden strolls at Simpson Demonstration Gardens. On the second Tuesday of each month of the growing season, 11 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., the Master Gardener volunteers will be in the gardens to answer questions and provide information on sustainable gardening. Continue reading

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Spring Ephemerals in the Shade, Part 2

By Mary Free, Certified Master Gardener Originally posted April 2012 Continued from Ephemerals in the Shade Garden – Part 1, featuring bulbs, corms and trilliums. Although Bon Air Park’s Shade Garden is home to spring flowers in a variety of … Continue reading

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Spring Ephemerals in the Shade, Part 1

If you have planted daffodils or crocuses, then you have grown ephemerals. Bulbs and corms produce a succession of colorful blooms from January to May. Once they complete their display, they retreat and rest underground until the next spring. . . . In the United States, though, the term “spring ephemerals” usually refers to native North American wildflowers whose natural habitat is a deciduous forest. Continue reading

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Garden Myth Busters!

THE MYTH: Put gravel or rocks in the bottom of containers to improve drainage. Continue reading

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Meet the Glencarlyn Library Community Garden Coordinators

The Glencarlyn Library Community Garden, one of the demonstration gardens maintained by Master Gardener volunteers and interns from the Arlington/Alexandria unit of Virginia Cooperative Extension, is now under the leadership of five coordinators: Paul Nuhn, Alyssa Ford Morel, Wendy Mills, Elaine Mills (not a relation), and Judy Funderburk. Continue reading

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Edible Flowers in the Vegetable Garden

When I plan a vegetable plot, I always include flowers. You might think that this would take needed space from the vegetables, but I argue that the flowers will pay you back handsomely. For one thing, they attract pollinators, such as bees, butterflies, and other beneficial insects during the growing period. Also, many flowers are edible, so one could argue that they earn their keep twice over. . . . Continue reading

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