Tag Archives: Betula nigra

Word of the Week: Etaerio

Unlike simple fruits, which develop from a single ovary in a flower, an etaerio develops from multiple ovaries (sometimes called fruitlets) in a single flower arranged over the surface of or within the flower’s receptacle. An etaerio is also called an aggregate fruit. Continue reading

Posted in Illustrated Glossary, Word of the Week, WoW | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Word of the Week: Etaerio

Word of the Week: Inflorescence

Some plants produce solitary flowers–one flower per stem. Others produce a cluster of flowers or inflorescences. They are grouped by the arrangement of flowers on the stalk and by the sequence of anthesis, or opening of the flower bud, which occurs in two forms, determinate and indeterminate. Continue reading

Posted in Illustrated Glossary, Word of the Week, WoW | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Word of the Week: Inflorescence

Word of the Week: Lenticel

What do the bark of a spicebush, the skin of an apple, and the skin of your face have in common? Continue reading

Posted in Illustrated Glossary, Word of the Week, WoW | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Word of the Week: Lenticel

Are You Lichen the Bark? Five Birch Trees of the Mid-Atlantic Region

Part 2: Five Birch Trees of the Mid-Atlantic Region
Learn about five birch trees native to different areas of the mid-Atlantic region. Their uses in a cultivated landscape are varied. Those with the showiest bark shine year-round as specimen, shade, or lawn trees. Continue reading

Posted in MG in the Garden, Public Education | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Are You Lichen the Bark? Five Birch Trees of the Mid-Atlantic Region